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KICK OFF 2012 WITH TURTLE TALK (Coast Reporter, December 2011)

For local residents, the next few weeks offer the chance to witness something truly amazing — turtles laying their eggs. Each year, from June until early July in the Pender Harbour region, female western painted turtles leave their freshwater lakes and come ashore to lay eggs. Read more...
 

 

 

WESTERN PAINTED TURTLE NESTING SEASON NEEDS VOLUNTEERS (Powell River Peak, June 2011)

It's that time of year when turtles will soon be leaving the safety of the water and crawling to dry land to lay eggs, a process the community is being asked to help monitor at the nesting area at Cranberry Lake. Read more...
 

 


TURTLE NESTING SEASON HAS ARRIVED (Coast Reporter, June 2011)

For local residents, the next few weeks offer the chance to witness something truly amazing — turtles laying their eggs. Each year, from June until early July in the Pender Harbour region, female western painted turtles leave their freshwater lakes and come ashore to lay eggs. Read more...
 

 

 

ENDANGERED SPECIES FINDS COAST FRIENDS (The Local, June 2011)

The Sunshine Coast Wildlife Project team has been working hard to create new nesting beaches for endangered Western Painted Turtles at two sites, North Lake and Lily Lake. Read more...
 

 


TURTLE BABIES DELIGHT VISITORS (Coast Reporter, April 2011)

Exclamations of delight and wonder abounded at the Iris Griffith Centre on April 9, as excited visitors glimpsed a rare treat — tiny turtle hatchlings, each the size of a loonie, emerging from their underground nest. Read more...

 

 

"10 QUESTIONS WITH..." (The Local, August 2010). Interview with Wildlife Project Leaders, Michelle Evelyn & David Stiles.

You both moved here in 2003, what drew you to the Sunshine Coast to work and live?

The incredible beauty, the diverse wildlife, the spectacular ecosystems—forests, ocean, rivers, lakes, mountains—all of the wonderful opportunities to get outdoors and enjoy nature. Through a fun poetry contest on CBC radio, we won tickets to the Sunshine Coast Writer’s Festival in 2002. We visited the Coast once and fell completely in love with the place and knew we had to find a way to make this our home. Read more...

 



HAVE YOU SEEN TURTLES? (Coast Reporter, June 2010)

Community members are being asked to help ensure the survival of our spectacular Western Painted Turtles by reporting their turtle sightings. The Sunshine Coast is home to one of the largest remaining populations of this federally endangered species. Read more...

 

 



THE TURTLES ARE HATCHING (Coast Reporter, April 2010).

Tiny and perfect, smaller than a toonie, the baby turtle emerges from the nest along with his brothers and sisters. He crawls from the earth and takes his first glimpse of the sun and first breath of fresh air. Although he is essentially a newborn, his face is wrinkled and already he looks ancient and wise. Read more...
 

 


EIGHT (YEARS) ISN'T ENOUGH: THE RUBY LAKE LAGOON SOCIETY (Harbour Spiel, March 2010).

When a cluster of conservationists formed the Ruby Lake Lagoon Society in the spring of 2002, few guessed what their efforts would yield eight years later. Today the Iris Griffith Field Studies and Interpretive Centre is a focal point of environmental research and conservation on the Sunshine Coast offering a resource centre and a variety of field studies and nature programs. Read more...
 

 


LANDOWNER HELPS BABY TURTLES (Harbour Spiel, November 2009)

In the soil, just inches below the surface, many tiny turtles, each the size of a loonie, lay nestled in their underground home near the shoreline of Sakinaw Lake. Landowner Pat Pelly had no idea that a nest filled with baby turtles was present in her yard until she began digging to install some stairs. Read more...
 

 


TURTLES INSPIRE YOUNG ARTISTS (The Local, October 2009)

Turtles have inspired artists for generations. Turtles are often depicted as symbols of patience and wisdom. They feature in religion, mythology and folklore from many parts of the world. Some legends say the Earth is borne on the back of a giant turtle. Read more...
 

 


YOUNG CONSERVATIONIST HELPS ENDANGERED TURTLES (The Local, June 2009)

For 6-year old Jasmine, it was a dream come true. Jasmine loves turtles. For her 5th birthday, rather than receive presents, Jasmine raised $400 for conservation of leatherback turtles in Nova Scotia. But she had never seen her favorite animal in the wild before. Read more...
 

 

BAT SCHOLARS (Bats Magazine, Summer 2002)

Four BCI research scholarships over five years helped Michelle Evelyn earn a Ph.D. at Stanford University. Along the way, she documented the critical importance of fruit-eating bats in regenerating Mexican forests and highlighted strategies for their conservation when slash-and-burn agriculture clears their forests. Read more...

 

SURVIVAL IN THE CITY: RESEARCHER STUDIES HOW BAT BEHAVE CLOSE TO HOME (Stanford Report, March 2001

To study how cutting down forests affects endangered wildlife, you could hardly choose a better species than bats. That's what Michelle Evelyn decided six years ago when she began her research.  Read more...

 

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